Monday, 2 January 2012

Always Expect The Unexpected......


Well hello and welcome to the first post from my new blog called

  'The Porage Diaries'.

Dont worry - 'Crivens Jings' is here to stay and will keep on in the same vein I hope but I'm going to try a blog of a more specific nature.......

To be frank I never expected to be setting up another blog right now even though I'd laid the foundations for 'The Porage Diaries' well over a year ago, when the name came to me one day in a haze of porage and sunshine. I know - most people see porage as a winter food, but I happen to like it and am known to have an occasional foray in a poragely direction at any time of the year.

We all get gifts at Christmas time. Most of the time these are more than welcome but sometimes the odd gift will arrive that's either unwelcome or at least greeted with less enthusiasm. This year the unwanted gift I got was type two diabetes which is quite annoying. Even more so when I consider that the person that gave it to me was; well - ME. Now, I take full responsibility: I'm a Scot - well known as having one of the worlds most unhealthy diets, which I have wholeheartedly embraced for many years.: I'm overweight - for many reasons, explanations or excuses which will probably come out in various guises as the blog develops: I'm in the danger zone of middle age {53}: I've lead a pretty sedentary lifestyle for far too long even though I knew I should have been doing something about it  {introduce those explanations/excuses again here} and finally: I'm a typical male 'ostrich' in many ways. There is simply no-one else to blame.

I'd been unwell for a few months and had complained to my doctor of lack of energy, aches and pains, insomnia, a general increasing weight despite addressing {somewhat} my diet for more healthy stuff and a dozen other things that I couldn't put down to any particular change in circumstances. This lead to a whole seies of blood tests over a short period of time and a diagnosis of an underactive thyroid and a slow process of medication and monitoring to establish the correct dosage of medication which I'll have to take for the rest of my life - a process that's not yet complete. During this time one of the tests threw up an anomaly with liver function leading to another series of tests and an ultrasound scan which showed that everything was tickety-boo and there was nothing abnormal. I came home from the hospital that day happy that my fears about the big 'C' were unfounded. Two hours later my  doctor's surgery phoned to say that there was a problem with my last blood tests and that my doctor wanted to see me right away, so first thing the following morning I saw her and was told that my blood sugar levels had suddenly rocketed and more tests were needed to confirm her suspicions that I had diabetes.

So it was that the week before Christmas I got a confirmation call that her suspicions were correct. Most of that week was spent reading up on the information she had provided, supplemented with information from the web and in making significant changes to my thinking. I have to admit after the previous few months I took the news quite badly and perhaps focused on some websites which emphasised the more negative and serious side of the condition and it's impact on long term health prospects. Probably as a result, my mood and well being took a big dip and I think I convinced myself that I felt dreadfully ill for the bulk of Christmas until one day I just suddenly realised that there are millions dealing with this and doing so successfully. I realised I'd perhaps been given the kick in the pants that I needed to get things back in balance and that tackling this could be beneficial in every way:

 I suddenly felt doors opening instead of doors closing. there are many opportunities that could come out of this condition - now that I have it and can't avoid that reality. There are things to discover, things to tackle and things that can be discussed and shared. 'Crivens Jings' showed me that I could use writing as catharsis as I did when I was made redundant. This too is something that I can write about while I experience, come to terms and understand what the implications have on the reality of my life ahead. While I'm not stupid enough to be looking forward to living with any kind of diabetes, I can see that there are benefits to be had for myself and maybe for others in writing about an experience that I can't avoid. So now I have to face some consequences and deal with this condition.

Do you fancy coming along for the ride? I promise you rants, raves and reflections - and porage:

LOTS OF PORAGE!

See you later.

 Listening to:

18 comments:

Nicky said...

OK, I'm in!

Alistair said...

Cheers you......

dbs said...

I'm with you man...maybe we can help each other.

Antares Cryptos said...

Alistair, I am sorry you got diagnosed with this, but as you said many live active lives with this illness.
Even if you start writing about basket-weaving I'll be here to read, my friend.

Alistair said...

Thanks to both of you. I Hope it'll be fun and not just a slog......

Dad said...

Crivvens, indeed! That was mighty big news to receive at any time of year Al, let alone right before Christmas. Bravo for deciding to face it with your chin up and head held high, it's always the right decision.

As far as coming along for the ride goes, count me in!

Alistair said...

Glad to have you along. Everyone needs a Dad behind them......

Twisted Scottish Bastard said...

Very strange, I was diagnosed with Type II diabetes in September. It does run in my family, but like you, I have nobody really to blame except myself. I'd be careful about the amount of porridge consumed though.
Remember Carbohydrates = Bad.

Alistair said...

Sound like a wee touch of synchronicity TSB.

and I hear you on the porage........

Rebecca S. said...

I detest porridge, but I like your writing, so I'm in, too. I know plenty of people who have kicked Type 2 Diabetes by exercise and diet changes, so there's hope for you, right?

Alistair said...

Detest porage? Poor you!

But glad to have you along as always.........

Cheers pal!

Jane said...

Definitely not missing this ride! A good friend of mine was diagnosed with Diabetes last year - she's always saying it's the best thing that could've happened to her. Now, I think that's taking it a bit too far, but I do understand where she's coming from. She's battled with her weight for years and this gave her the jolt that she really needed (her words, not mine!) Nine months on, she says she feels better now than she's felt for over twenty years with more energy and a general sense of well-being.
I sense that this journey is going to be a positive one for you too Al - and I look forward very much to reading all about it!

Alistair said...

Thanks Jane - for coming along and the words of encouragement. I hope it'll be a force for change for me. I don't have much alternative really. The tale of your pal is really encouraging. I hope for the some outcome too.

Kat_RN said...

Oh no! Not fun, but I think you have the right attitude. If you do what the doctor tells you, it doesn't have to be so bad.
Good luck with everything, and keep writing.
Cheers,
Kat

Alistair said...

Thanks Kat - I will don't worry.....

Kat_RN said...

Alistair,
Do we need to follow on another location to see porridge diarys?

Alistair said...

I put a link at the top of this or go through my profile to select. There's just the one post {just what's reposted here} so far but I'll be posting more shortly once things start to happen......

Morning's Minion said...

Dealing with any chronic condition is not fun--but discipline and attitude have a lot to do with it. We have several friends who manage type 2 diabetes very well. Not to minimize the situation, but there could have been worse things to deal with.
I hope to hear that you sort this one and begin to feel better.

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